Entered By: grant on October 19, 2014 No Observations
Science Art: <i>Leonid Meteor Storm, as seen over North America on the night of November 12-13, 1833 </i>

This is a celestial event recorded beautifully in E. Weiß’s Bilderatlas der Sternenwelt, the “Picture-Atlas of the Star-World”. I’m not sure, but I think that’s Niagara Falls. In the decades before Edison, the night sky must have been lovely.

Dark. Except when lit from above.

Image via ia Public Domain Review

Tags: []
Entered By: grant on October 17, 2014 No Observations

Laboratory Equipment sings the praises of the latest soldiers keeping our harbors safe from attack – a
secret army of (cheap) robot bowling balls:

Originally designed to look for cracks in nuclear reactors’ water tanks, the robot could also inspect ships for the false hulls and propeller shafts that smugglers frequently use to hide contraband. [...]

Tags: []
Entered By: grant on October 16, 2014 No Observations

Science Daily reveals some interesting (and counter-intuitive) findings following the world’s largest medical study of human consciousness at time of death:

The results of a four-year international study of 2060 cardiac arrest cases across 15 hospitals concludes the following. The themes relating to the experience of death appear far broader than what has been [...]

Entered By: grant on October 14, 2014 No Observations

Nature paints a more vivid picture of climate change – and the related changes in ocean currents – by retracing the paths of prehistoric icebergs in the years when the oceans were colder:

Their results show that some of the glacial floodwater running off North America formed a narrow current some 100 kilometres wide [...]

Entered By: grant on October 13, 2014 No Observations

Sound like conspiracy theory, doesn’t it? But Space.com is reporting on the easily-forgotten OTHER space shuttle program – the

Entered By: grant on October 12, 2014 No Observations
Science Art: <i>Phramgocone of Belemnitella, In Flint</i>, 1851

Click to embiggen slightly

A “phragmocone” is a fancy word for a shell of a nautilus or ammonoid, and “Belemnitella” is a genus of belemnite, which is to say, a prehistoric critter like squid with a long, chambered shell… that it kept inside, like a skeleton.

Once upon a time, they were all [...]

Entered By: grant on October 10, 2014 No Observations

Nature breaks the news to behaviorists – and this is more important than it might seem – that fish don’t really think mirrors are uninvited strangers:

“There’s been a very long history of using a mirror as it’s just so handy,” says Robert Elwood, an animal-behaviour researcher at Queen’s University in Belfast, UK. Using [...]

Entered By: grant on October 9, 2014 No Observations

National Geographic explains why cave paintings in Sulawesi are winding back the origin of “art” as a concept to our African origins:

“Overwhelmingly depicted in Europe and Sulawesi were large, and often dangerous, mammal species that possibly played major roles in the belief systems of these people,” says archaeologist and study leader Maxime [...]

Tags: []
Entered By: grant on October 8, 2014 No Observations

Even, Nature explains, from cows that have never been around antibiotics. Something about cow manure runoff helps resistant bacteria grow in the soil:

Because manure itself is known to change the composition of bacterial communities in soil, a team led by microbiologist Jo Handelsman, then at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, decided to [...]

Tags: []
  Copyright ©2011 The Guild of Scientific Troubadours, All rights reserved.| Music Saves Lives.| Powered by WordPress| Simple Indy theme by India Fascinates