June 2011

Science Art: Scheutz mechanical calculator (Zeichnung der Difference Engine No.1 aus dem Jahr 1853), 1867.

Scheutz_mechanical_calculator
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Now, after that brief, regrettable interruption in service, a tribute to the computer.

This illustration is from The Elements of Natural Philosophy; Or, An Introduction to the Study of the Physical Sciences, a book Charles Brooke wrote, expanding upon the work of Golding Bird. If Brooke did the illustrations or if someone else did, I’m not sure.

This is a machine used to make mathematics; it’s an ancestor of the computer, and a kind of difference engine. The machine…

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SONG: Vulnerable Ape Theory (Going to a Blues Show with the Young Earth Creationists)

SONG: “Vulnerable Ape Theory (Going to a Blues Show with the Young Earth Creationists)”.

ARTIST: grant.

SOURCE:Based on “Vulnerability made us human: how our early ancestors turned disability into advantage”, PhysOrg, 15 June 2015, as used in the post “The Vulnerable Ape theory of human origins.

ABSTRACT: This is the late song. I had the chorus on time, but no verses. Will these do? They have mutations and selection in them.

This is a song about tolerating people who are wrong an…

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Science Art: Fig. XLIII. Hydromylos, sive aquaria mola, 1662.

Style: "1752367"

This is a waterwheel, from a book written by architect and engineer Georg Andreas Boeckler, under the title Theatrum machinarum novum : exhibens opera molaria et aquatica constructum industria Georgi Andrea Böckleri… and so on. (The title page doesn’t have a lot of white space on it.)

For the Renaissance, this is pretty high tech – it turns running water into flour!

Boeckler built fountains. He had a thing for moving water… and moving things with water. His whole book of wonderfu…

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Science Art: Paper Wings, by Nicole Frost.

PaperWingsNicoleFrost
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These are paper sculptures of birds’ wings – four specific categories of birds’ wings. As explained by their creator:

This is my paper sculpture of the basic structural differences of the wing types in birds: High Lift, Elliptical, High Aspect/Soaring, and High Speed. Some of the most important differences were the inclusion of wing slots and the alula.

That’s a lot of little snips done just right.

I found this on Clip Its Wings Art (via Scientific Illustrati…

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Science Art: Beetle, magnified 26 diameters, 1871.

MinuteBeetleCommonInSpring_ObjectsForTheMicroscope
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This seems to be a minute beetle, as pictured in Objects for the microscope, being a popular description of the most instructive and beautiful subjects for exhibition by Louisa Lane Clarke.

Whether that’s a beetle that happens to be minute (as in small) or does something quickly, or if it’s one of a number of beetles called “minute something beetles” is unclear to me.

It’s quite lovely, though. This is a sample of a larger illustration. Nearby on the same page, you ca…

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Science Art: Comparison between Deinonychus and Velociraptor's feet, by Danny Cicchetti.

Sickle_Claws
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File this, I guess, under “the problem with Jurassic Park.”

The little claw at the bottom belonged to the fearsome Velociraptor, a category of creatures most of whom were about the size of a house cat ( like so ). The big scary claw up top belongs to Deionychus, closer to the size of a German shepherd… or the super-scary dinosaurs in the movie ( like so ).

The really scary uncle of these guys was Utahraptor, just for the record. About the size of a small car… and…

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Fear remembers.

30 June 2011 // 0 Comments

Next time you’re stuck trying to get Boyle’s Law or some cute person’s email into your memory, think of something awful. That’s [...]

Plastic isn’t sexy.

29 June 2011 // 0 Comments

Not just looking at – being around it. Science Daily has the skinny on how BPA is making male mice less attractive to females: The latest research [...]

Google vs. Nonsense

28 June 2011 // 0 Comments

In my day job, I’m not a scientist – I’m a writer. So it pleases me immensely to see this New York Times piece on the innovative ways [...]

Evolution machine

27 June 2011 // 0 Comments

Genetic engineers have, in the latest New Scientist, devised a device that (deviously) speeds up the process of evolution: For instance, a yeast [...]

Uncut lovers.

24 June 2011 // 0 Comments

That’s Denmark for you. The International Journal of Epidemiology published an article from Danish researchers who found circumcision isn’t [...]

Robot astronauts.

21 June 2011 // 0 Comments

I suppose automation just made the Space Shuttle obsolete (or, well, something like that). MSNBC reports that the latest supply ship to the ISS is [...]

A dying flash.

20 June 2011 // 0 Comments

CSM takes a somber look at a star essentially giving a final wave as it’s swallowed by a black hole: Using Swift observations and others by the [...]

Star sprinklers.

16 June 2011 // 1 Comment

Just in time for summer, National Geographic lets us know that someone left the sprinklers on way up there: The discovery suggests that protostars may be [...]

Mother cow.

15 June 2011 // 0 Comments

It must be strange to work in a facility like the ones Sky News just reported on – the places where genetically modified cows produce human breast [...]
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