13 February 2012

Plate LXXVII: The First Picture of an American Butterfly from The Butterfly Book by W.J. Holland, 1930 edition.

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In 1930, this picture… or rather, the picture with the inscriptions beside it… had never before been published. And the inscriptions are rather interesting. In Latin, the short one reads, “Hanc e Virginia Americana Candidus ad me Pictor detulit, 1587″, which the author of The Butterfly Book (where I found this) translates as “White, the painter, brought this picture to me from American Virginia, 1587″.

White, we’re pretty sure, was John White, described elsewhere as …

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SONG: I Am Sailing

SONG: “I Am Sailing.”

ARTIST: grant.

SOURCE:Based on “LightSail”, sail.planetary.org, retrieved 13 May 2015, as used in the post “A solar sail unfurling. Not sometime in the unspecified future – *next week*.

ABSTRACT: Is this the song I wanted to write? I’m not sure. The lyrics were not the same as where I was aiming, but I stole a first line from a reflective moment, reminiscing about the hell of junior high school, in this podcast. Thank you, Mister Roderick, for a lyric.

The i…

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Science Art: Os Maxillaires Fossiles, by Pieter Camper.

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Jaws!

Pieter Camper was a fossil collector, and in 1786, he drew this jaw he’d acquired. He thought it belonged to a toothed whale. Another collector had a similar jaw from the same bunch of rocks (dug up near Maastricht), and *he* thought it was a crocodile.

Georges Cuvier (with Camper’s son) later proved that it was neither of those things, but an extinct marine reptile, Mosasaurus hoffmanni, who swam in the seas during those years when T. rex roamed around on land….

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Science Art: From Die Frau als Hausärztin by Anna Fischer-Dückelmann, 1911

Die_Frau_als_Hausärztin_(1911)_137_Weibliche_Normalgestalt

This is a naked woman, as seen in 1911 by a German medical expert. The book’s title translates to “The Woman As Family Doctor,” and it’s pretty much a home health guide specializing in those mysterious conditions that affect women and children. Gynecology and pediatrics, basically.

It’s full of some amazing illustrations and wonderful typography, so check it out on archive.org.

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Science Art: Lecture 2, Figure 5, from Lectures on Ventilation,

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from Lectures on Ventilation (1869) by Lewis W. Leeds, via Public Domain Review.

The invisible made visible.

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Science Art: The Golden Horns of Gallehus.

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These are two ancient horns, made of gold and engraved (or embossed) with runes and pictures that seem to tell a story. Or maybe just look cool.

Also, they are horns that it seems like no one ever blew (one translation of one inscription is about drinking), and they are horns that are not there:

The original horns were stolen and melted down in 1802. Casts made of the horns in the late 18th century were also lost. Replicas of the horns must thus rely on 17th and 18th-century drawings…

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