Science Art: Theoria Satellitum Iovis et Saturni from Atlas Coelestis by Johann Gabriel Doppelmayr, 1742.

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A geometry of the heavens (specifically the moons of Jupiter and Saturn0, as envisioned by mathematician, astronomer, and mapmaker Johann Gabriel Doppelmayr, a German who also spoke French, Italian and English. He published an atlas of the stars using images previously published by his long-time collaborator Johann Baptist Homann, a Dominican monk who converted to Protestantism and who had previously published Grosser Atlas ueber die ganze Welt, a great atlas of the whole world.

The full name of Doppelmayr’s star atlas is (take a breath): Atlas Coelestis in quo Mundus Spectabilis et in eodem Stellarum omnium Phoenomena notabilia, circa ipsarum Lumen, Figuram, Faciem, Motum, Eclipses, Occultationes, Transitus, Magnitudines, Distantias, aliaque secundum Nic. Copernici et ex parte Tychonis de Brahe Hipothesin. Nostri intuitu, specialiter, respectu vero ad apparentias planetarum indagatu possibiles e planetis primariis, et e luna habito, generaliter e celeberrimorum astronomorum observationibus graphice descripta exhibentur, cum tabulis majoribus XXX

Doppelmayr died in 1750, possibly as a result of receiving an electrical shock from a bank of batteries he’d been experimenting with.

Today, he has a crater on the moon and a minor planet named in his honor.

Image found in the Atlas Coelestis webpage.

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