Guild Affairs

Administrivia and Internal Matters

Science Art: Giant Animals: Modern and Extinct (detail), by Mary McLain

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These are prehistoric animals compared to their modern relatives and, for scale, a human. A human who’s interested in what they’re like… except when…

Look out! HELL PIG!

There are plenty more of the majestic giants (and some terrifying ones) at NPR’s Skunk Bear tumblog.

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Science Art: Jupiter's Rings by LORRI, 2007.

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The New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) snapped this photo of Jupiter’s ring system on February 24, 2007, from a distance of 7.1 million kilometers (4.4 million miles).

This processed image shows a narrow ring, about 1,000 kilometers (600 miles) wide, with a fainter sheet of material inside it. The faint glow extending in from the ring is likely caused by fine dust that diffuses in toward Jupiter. This is the outer tip of the “halo,” a cloud of dust …

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SONG: Thirty-Five Minutes (from Earth)

SONG: “Thirty-Five Minutes (from Earth)”.

ARTIST: grant.

SOURCE:Based on “NASA Windbots Could Explore Gas Giant Jupiter”, Sky News, 24 July 2015, as used in the post as used in the post “Windbots to explore Jupiter – the bumpier the ride, the better..”

ABSTRACT: The planet Jupiter is 35 light-minutes from Earth (give or take a couple of minutes depending on where in its orbit the planet is).

So a robot floating in the turbulent winds of Jupiter would take that long to send a mes…

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Science Art: Doree, Zeus, Faber by Edward Donovan

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Three names for one little fish. And those are just the beginning.

I found this one on the Scientific Illustration tumblog, which quoted Wikipedia on the doree (etc.):

John Dory, St Pierre or Peter’s Fish, refers to fish of the genus Zeus, especially Zeus faber, of widespread distribution. It is an edible benthic coastal marine fish with a laterally compressed olive-yellow body which has a large dark spot, and long spines on the dorsal fin. The dark spot is used to flash an ‘evil ey…

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Science Art: Her Majesty's Cochins; Imported in 1843, published 1904.

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These are ostensibly Cochin chickens, or forerunners of what we’d call Cochins today. They’re a breed with a *lot* of character, and are uniquely suited, temperamentally, for being “pet” chickens moreso than egg factories or walking meat supplies. Despite the name (after a part of India), they’re originally from China.

This picture is from The Asiatics; Brahmas, Cochins and Langshans, all varieties, their origin; peculiarities of shape and color; egg production; their ma…

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Science Art: Soaking Up the Rays of a Sun-Like Star, by NASA Ames/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle, 2015.

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This is an artist’s impression of a planet just discovered by NASA’s Kepler mission that’s gotten the folks at SETI all excited.

It’s the most Earth-like planet yet discovered. Kepler 452b sits in the “Goldilocks” zone around its star, not too hot and not too cold, and is about the same size (or is a little larger) and made of something like the same stuff as the planet we’re sitting around on right now. It takes 365 days to orbit around its sun, too. NASA’s calling it ou…

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No song today.

23 December 2014 // 0 Comments

It’s been a season, this holiday has. Mea maxima culpa. One verse and an arrangement sans guitar does not a song make. It’ll be posted soon, as will a penitential cover. (I still owe two, actually, now that I think of it. Hmm.)

Guild Salute: Michael Hearst, Songs for Unusual Creatures

21 February 2014 // 0 Comments

Michael Hearst! Composer! Writer! Player of atypical instruments! Science fan! You are compiling instrumentals based on wonderful animals, like the glass frog, the magnapinna squid, and, as performed below by The Kronos Quartet, the aye-aye: You are a man of science, wonder and music. The Guild salutes you! Here’s more about him in his own words, talking about the making of his album and some of the musicians (Margaret Leng Tan!) he got involved with the project: [I heard him on The Takeaway]

Science Art: “How to Get Ahead in Science? Simple.” Jim Kelly, Houston Press, August 19, 1991.

3 September 2013 // 0 Comments

Ever since the Buckyball story broke big last year, Rice University chemist Rick Smalley has been getting the phone calls. Rick, they say, this is Jamie in Minnesota, and I saw this article. I just wanted you to know that I’ve dreamed about this molecule and now I can see it. And Smalley, whose job it is in a sense to dream about molecules, finds himself talking to a complete stranger about the one he discovered by accident. Officially, the molecule is called buckminsterfullerene, in honor of the eccentric futurist-inventor R. Buckminster Fuller, and it fascinates not only the Jamies of this world, but the Paul Chus as well…. Ride easy, Jim.

The Guild reviewed.

14 March 2012 // 0 Comments

Check this out: http://www.newscientist.com/blogs/culturelab/2012/03/songs-torn-from-science-headlines.html Forget your Variety and your Rolling Stone. The Guild of Scientific Troubadours just received positive notice from a writer for New Scientist. Success!

A salute: Trying and trying and trying by Gethan Dick.

6 March 2012 // 0 Comments

Over the transom this morning, I just got word of an amazing science-music-art project that combined six University College London biomedical researchers with six bands to make a pretty great album: This project was funded by the Wellcome Trust and involved working with six different UCL bio-medical scientists (Dr Alex Dedman, Dr Sam Tazzyman, Dr Zarinah Agnew, Kara Cerveny PhD, Dr Nandi Simpson and Dr Martin Austwick) to write truthful but poetic explorations of their research, then taking the lyrics to six exciting, innovative and award-winning musicians (birdengine, The 9000, Reeps One, Hannah Marshall, Workers Union Ensemble and The Overdrive Orchestra) and working with them to record six unique new songs. In each, the science feeds directly into the music: one song uses electric guitars to copy an optical frequency graph with their noise levels; in another song about genetic codes, A and D notes are inverted ; and in another, a beatboxer channels an […]

A Higgs boson walks into a cathedral…

20 September 2011 // 0 Comments

No, really. A religion and science joke. A Higgs boson walks into St. Patrick’s Cathedral on a fine Sunday morning. The monsignor looks up and reacts angrily, “Get thee behind me, Higgs boson, and leave our place of worship!” The Higgs boson turns on his heel and says, “Fine. But you’ll regret it. You can’t have mass without me.” [via]

“Watasenia Scintillans Addresses the New Graduates” by Squid Pro Crow.

24 August 2011 // 0 Comments

Watasenia Scintillans Addresses the New Graduates by Squid Pro Crow So. If you’ve noticed me referring obliquely to a “special project” lately, or to “having a thing” that’s taking up my time since April or so, this is it. The thing. This is what I’ve been working on for the past few months. Just a taste. There’s more to come. Words by Kate Horowitz, who can be found over here. We’ve been taking to time to get it right. And what do you know – this is what comes out. Watch this page (or Squid Pro Crow on bandcamp) for more.

Song delay

23 July 2011 // 0 Comments

What, it’s the 23rd and there’s no song? Yes, it’s true. I’m moving (yet again) and have been unable to record between the packing and unpacking. Expect one shortly. And a penitential cover. And, perhaps, some news that might make the wait worthwhile.

Song delay.

23 September 2010 // 0 Comments

This hasn’t been a week for lyrics. September’s song will be completely shortly, followed by another penitential cover.

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