Home » Archive

Science

Written By: grant on October 22, 2014 No Comment

Science Daily has more dietary recommendations for resetting your body’s clock:

Disrupted circadian clocks, researchers believe, are the reason that shift workers experience higher incidents of type 2 diabetes, obesity and cancer. The body’s primary circadian clock, which regulates sleep and eating, is in the brain. But other body tissues also have circadian clocks, [...]

Tags: []
Written By: grant on October 21, 2014 No Comment

Nature has more on how the veterinary tranquilizer-slash-rave drug can reverse “anhedonia” (the inability to feel happy) for 14 days – long enough to bust sufferers out of otherwise untreatable bipolar depression:

The present study used a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover design to examine whether a single ketamine infusion could reduce anhedonia levels in [...]

Written By: grant on October 20, 2014 No Comment

Science Daily discusses UC Davis researchers who are using light to edit out specific memories:

Optogenetics, pioneered by Karl Diesseroth at Stanford University, is a new technique for manipulating and studying nerve cells using light. The techniques of optogenetics are rapidly becoming the standard method for investigating brain function.

Kazumasa Tanaka, Brian Wiltgen and colleagues at [...]

Tags: [, ]
Written By: grant on October 19, 2014 No Comment
Science Art: <i>Leonid Meteor Storm, as seen over North America on the night of November 12-13, 1833 </i>

This is a celestial event recorded beautifully in E. Weiß’s Bilderatlas der Sternenwelt, the “Picture-Atlas of the Star-World”. I’m not sure, but I think that’s Niagara Falls. In the decades before Edison, the night sky must have been lovely.

Dark. Except when lit from above.

Image via ia Public Domain Review

Tags: []
Written By: grant on October 17, 2014 No Comment

Laboratory Equipment sings the praises of the latest soldiers keeping our harbors safe from attack – a
secret army of (cheap) robot bowling balls:

Originally designed to look for cracks in nuclear reactors’ water tanks, the robot could also inspect ships for the false hulls and propeller shafts that smugglers frequently use to hide contraband. [...]

Tags: []
Written By: grant on October 16, 2014 No Comment

Science Daily reveals some interesting (and counter-intuitive) findings following the world’s largest medical study of human consciousness at time of death:

The results of a four-year international study of 2060 cardiac arrest cases across 15 hospitals concludes the following. The themes relating to the experience of death appear far broader than what has been [...]

Written By: grant on October 14, 2014 No Comment

Nature paints a more vivid picture of climate change – and the related changes in ocean currents – by retracing the paths of prehistoric icebergs in the years when the oceans were colder:

Their results show that some of the glacial floodwater running off North America formed a narrow current some 100 kilometres wide [...]

Written By: grant on October 13, 2014 No Comment

Sound like conspiracy theory, doesn’t it? But Space.com is reporting on the easily-forgotten OTHER space shuttle program – the

Written By: grant on October 12, 2014 No Comment
Science Art: <i>Phramgocone of Belemnitella, In Flint</i>, 1851

Click to embiggen slightly

A “phragmocone” is a fancy word for a shell of a nautilus or ammonoid, and “Belemnitella” is a genus of belemnite, which is to say, a prehistoric critter like squid with a long, chambered shell… that it kept inside, like a skeleton.

Once upon a time, they were all [...]

  Copyright ©2011 The Guild of Scientific Troubadours, All rights reserved.| Music Saves Lives.| Powered by WordPress| Simple Indy theme by India Fascinates