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Written By: grant on September 21, 2014 No Comment
Science Art: Sarcoptes scabiei,  from <i>Brockhaus’ Konversations-Lexikon</i>, 1892.

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They itch. They dig in and they itch.

These are the mites that cause scabies, the tiny tunnelers, burrowing into the skin and digesting as they go. If your German’s good, you can read more about them in Brockhaus’ Konversations-Lexikon yourself.

Or, you can rely on a more modern source.

Either [...]

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Written By: grant on September 14, 2014 No Comment
Science Art: <i>Figure 3, Transverse Section of a Single Cell</i> by F. Bauer, Esq., F.R.S., 1827.

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Take a deep breath.

This is the inside of your lung, seen really closely. At the time his was drawn, we weren’t really sure what it did, other than… breathe.

It’s from a An Examination into the Structure of the Cells of the Human Lungs; with a View to Ascertain the [...]

Written By: grant on September 7, 2014 No Comment
Science Art: <i>Echinodermata, Plate V</i> detail, by James A. Grieg, 1921

This is the heart (and brain and pretty much anything that’s not an arm) of a brittle star, as sketched for Echinodermata, a study of the sea urchins, sand dollars, sea stars and close relatives collected by the Michael Sars Deep Sea Expedition in the North Atlantic in 1910. It was published by [...]

Written By: grant on August 31, 2014 No Comment
Science Art: <i>Urban Expansion of Shenyang, China</i>, 2014.


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This is a story of explosive growth, as told by the USGS Landsat satellite, and recorded in the Earth Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center “Image of the Week” collection.

On the left is Shenyang in 1984. On the right, the same location 30 years later. City is spreading like… [...]

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Written By: grant on August 24, 2014 No Comment
Science Art: <i>The moon’s influence on earth’s tides</i>, c 1930s.

A planetary self-portrait, apparently from Wonderland of Science, a book published in the 1930s.

[via scientificillustration.tumblr.com]

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Written By: grant on August 17, 2014 No Comment
Science Art: Excerpt from <i>The Arabic Machine Manuscript</i>.


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This mysterious water-driven machine is from a mysterious Arabic manuscript, somewhere between 200 and 500 years old. The whole document is full of mechanisms with scoops and gears and vats and water. It’s part of the Max Planck Digital Library collection but I found it on The Public Domain Review.

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Written By: grant on August 10, 2014 No Comment
Science Art: <i>The Common Angler (</i>Lophius piscatorus<i>) (After W. Von Wright in Smitt)</i>, 1905.

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This is from the Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections in the Biodiversity Library.

I bet there’s all *kinds* of things in the Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections. Doesn’t that mean, like, their junk drawer?

Can you even imagine? Full of anglerfish… and stranger things.

Written By: grant on August 3, 2014 No Comment
Science Art: <i>Stephenson’s Patent</i>, 1850.


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From The Principles and Practice and Explanation of the Machinery of Locomotive Engines in Operation, found on archive.org.

The book seems to be part of an 1850 re-printing of Thomas Tredgold’s 1827 masterwork… (deep breath)… The steam engine : comprising an account of its invention and progressive improvement; with an investigation [...]

Written By: grant on July 27, 2014 No Comment
Science Art: <i>The Englishman Watt wanted to make a steam engine…</i>, 1873.

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Translation: The Englishman Watt wanted to make a steam engine. He spent so much time on it that he upset his aunt. Finally, however, he was successful.

From Public Domain Review‘s collection of prints of Western inventors, artists and scholars produced by the Japanese Department of Education.

In part, to demonstrate [...]

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