Home » Archive

Science Art

Written By: grant on December 14, 2014 No Comment
Science Art: <i>Fig 114 – July normal sea-level pressure, Southern Hemisphere</i>.

Click to embiggen

Making the invisible visible – the air over the South Pole, Australia, Tierra del Fuego, Cape Town and beyond.

From General Meteorology (Published Formerly Under The Title Synoptic and Aeronautical Meteorology), 1944, by Horace Robert Byers, Sc.D. The first printing seems to have been in 1937, and the maps have a marvelous […]

Tags: []
Written By: grant on December 7, 2014 No Comment
Science Art: <i>Age of Oceanic Crust</i>, NOAA, modified by Rapture2018.

This is how the the gooey inside becomes the crusty outside… oozing up from rifts.

Tags: []
Written By: grant on November 30, 2014 No Comment
Science Art: <i>Fig 2: Lateral views of the skull and lower jaw… (etc.)</i>

Click to embiggen

My son and I just spent the afternoon watching the charming Your Inner Fish series (his idea, not mine), and learned all kinds of fascinating things about the importance of jaws. They’re where our ears come from. Well, our sensitive, mammalian ears.

And that transformation started with critters like these – […]

Tags: []
Written By: grant on November 23, 2014 No Comment
Science Art: <i>Text-fig. 5. – Model of electron paths</i>, 1946

Click to embiggen

It looks like a wrought-iron finial for a curtain rod. It’s actually a demonstration of how electrons can be used as a lens – how an electron microscope make such small things visible.

Found in Introduction to the Electron Microscope by F.E.J. Ockenden, 1946.

Written By: grant on November 16, 2014 No Comment
Science Art: <i>#11268</i> (Small, Unidentified Insect On the Exoskeletal Surface Of A Dragonfly)

Click to embiggen

This is a strange bug from PHIL, the CDC’s Public Health Image Library. Not the kind of bug the CDC usually deals with… it’s an unidentified insect found, mysteriously enough, on the outside of an unidentified dragonfly. Sticking to an antenna, in fact.

As PHIL says, Though this arthropod was found […]

Tags: []
Written By: grant on November 9, 2014 No Comment
Science Art: Hydrarchos Sillimanni, from <i>The great sea-serpent</i>, by A. C. Oudemans, 1892.


Click to embiggen vastly

Quoting here from Oudemans’ book:

In 1845 Dr. Albert C. Koch, “exhibited a large skeleton of a fossil animal, under the name of Hydrarchos Sillimanni in Broadway, New York, purporting to be that of an extinct marine serpent. These remains consisted of a head and vertebral column, measuring in all 114 […]

Tags: []
Written By: grant on November 2, 2014 No Comment
Science Art: <i>Submarine Reactor</i>, by Webber, 2007.

How the submarine goes.

Found on Wikimedia Commons.

Tags: []
Written By: grant on October 19, 2014 No Comment
Science Art: <i>Leonid Meteor Storm, as seen over North America on the night of November 12-13, 1833 </i>

This is a celestial event recorded beautifully in E. Weiß’s Bilderatlas der Sternenwelt, the “Picture-Atlas of the Star-World”. I’m not sure, but I think that’s Niagara Falls. In the decades before Edison, the night sky must have been lovely.

Dark. Except when lit from above.

Image via ia Public Domain Review

Tags: []
Written By: grant on October 12, 2014 No Comment
Science Art: <i>Phramgocone of Belemnitella, In Flint</i>, 1851

Click to embiggen slightly

A “phragmocone” is a fancy word for a shell of a nautilus or ammonoid, and “Belemnitella” is a genus of belemnite, which is to say, a prehistoric critter like squid with a long, chambered shell… that it kept inside, like a skeleton.

Once upon a time, they were all […]

  Copyright ©2011 The Guild of Scientific Troubadours, All rights reserved.| Music Saves Lives.| Powered by WordPress| Simple Indy theme by India Fascinates