Science Art: Representations of the Braid Groups by Nancy Scherich, overall winner, Dance Your Ph.D. 2017.

“A representation is faithful if it has only one braid in its kernel.”

So, this is doctorate-level mathematics rendered as interpretative dance, and that is not a joke.

It’s really kind of beautiful. There’s even a plot, and a plot twist.

The other 2017 Dance Your Ph.D. winners this year are pretty great, too.

I only recently found out about this annual Science magazine contest, now in its 10th year, from my better half.

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Science Art: Ordo Fecundus (Steinfurz und Flidermaus), 1553

Taken from ‘Icones Animalium Quadruped Viviparorum et Oviparorum’ by Conrad Gessner ( 1516-1565 )Click to embiggen slightly

An owl and a bat, in German and Latin, as presented by Conrad Gessner in Icones Animalium Quadruped Viviparorum et Oviparorum.

This may have been more timely on Halloween, but really, it’s been available since the 16th century. Any day is a good day… or any night is a good night, really… for Owl and Bat.

[via Scientific Illustration]

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Science Art: When (Neutron) Stars Collide, by NASA

from https://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/iotd.htmlClick to embiggen

There’s not much information on the NASA Image of the Day site explaining how this visualization was made. It’s meant to show what it looks like in space when two neutron stars – very dense, huge objects – slam into each other.

This is actually seconds *before* they collide, when their gravity starts stripping off debris from each other, forming a massive cloud of dust. Then, impact.

From a safe distance, it looks a little like a chrysanthemum….

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SONG: "Heaven is Our Home"

SONG: “Heaven is Our Home”.

ARTIST: grant.

SOURCE:Tiangong-1: Chinese space station will crash to Earth within months,” The Guardian, 13 Oct 2017, as used in the post “Tiangong-1 is falling to Earth.

ABSTRACT:
I appear to have killed my laptop. The very last thing I did on it, with a screen twice as bright as normal and no spacebar, backspace, or letters “g” or “x” – was finish a vocal track last night and load the song into this site. (Amazing what you can manage by cutting and pas…

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Science Art: Plate C from The rotifera; or, Wheel-animalcules, both British and foreign, 1889

Click to embiggen

Teeny tiny critters, hanging out in the water. They’ve got cilia in a circle, waving around their tops as if they were wheels, spinning.

A glimpse of the microscopic world from The rotifera; or, Wheel-animalcules, both British and foreign, by C.T. Hudson.

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Roll out the solar!

20 November 2007 grant b 0

Popular Science has named the nanosolar powersheet the “Best of What’s New 2007,” and for good reason. Instead of using big glass frames to generate […]

Jules Verne: Bleak Futurist

19 November 2007 grant b 0

People nowadays look at Jules Verne as one of the forefathers of science fiction, anticipating amazing technological developments like swift, giant submarines and capsules landing […]

Giggle-bot is FRIEND!

13 November 2007 grant b 0

Yep, scientists at UC San Diego seem to have found a way around the uncanny valley problem (the more “human” a robot, the creepier it […]

“See” cucumbers.

9 November 2007 grant b 0

OK, sorry for that headline. New Scientist reports that a University of South Florida researcher has found a way to replace human corneas with sea […]