Science Art: Bearing Fault Detector, 1975

MSFC led us to safter railwaysClick to embiggen
NASA wants you to know they’re pretty handy here on Earth, too. This here shows a way to make trains and other things that use big, strong bearings safer, by using tricks we learned on Skylab. Before it crashed.

As they explain:

Marhsall Space Flight Center’s scientists have developed a detection concept based on the fact that bearing defects excite resonant frequency of rolling elements of the bearing as they impact the defect. By detecting resonant frequency and sub…

Read more

Science Art: A View From A Launch, by NASA/Joel Kowsky

The Soyuz MS-08 rocket is launched with Expedition 55 Soyuz Commander Oleg Artemyev of Roscosmos and flight engineers Ricky Arnold and Drew Feustel of NASA, Wednesday, March 21, 2018 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Artemyev, Arnold, and Feustel will spend the next five months living and working aboard the International Space Station. Click to embiggen

This is the bus that takes the astronauts to work at the space station. It’s a long commute for a longer shift – they took two days to orbit Earth before getting into position, and then they’ll spend five months up there.

The Soyuz MS-08 rocket launched with Expedition 55 Soyuz Commander Oleg Artemyev of Roscosmos and astronauts Ricky Arnold and Drew Feustel of NASA, Wednesday, March 21, 2018, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

From the NASA Image of the Day

Read more

Science Art: Growth of Egg of Hen, c. 16th century.

Growth of Egg of Hen, from De formatione ovi, et pulli / [Fabricius ab Aquapendente]

From De formatione ovi, et pulli, by Fabricius ab Aquapendente, also known as Hieronymus Fabricius or Girolamo Fabrizio d’Acquapendente. He was an Italian surgeon who helped found modern embryology at around the same time the first English colonies in North America were still just an idea, and cutting-edge transportation technology consisted of figuring out a way to stick another sail or two on a ship.

I found these eggs hidden in the Wellcome Library.

Read more

Science Art: Kerr-Flaechen.gif (Ergospheres, Event horizons and the ring singularity of a rotating black hole.)

from: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Kerr-Flaechen.gif

This is an animated gif showing a ring singularity or “ringularity” of a spinning black hole. A black hole that doesn’t spin will collapse into a point; a spinning black hole (also called a “Kerr black hole” after the mathematician who described it) will bulge at the equator and create something weird: a ring with zero thickness but a non-zero radius. It’s big in one direction, but not there in another.

The center of gravity will appear to be different depending on where an observer is r…

Read more

SONG: Titanium (penitential cover)

SONG: “Titanium” (penitential cover)

ARTIST: grant.

SOURCE: This has no scientific source; it’s a penitential cover for being late for the February song. (I think I’m still one behind from November.) It’s originally by David Guetta, though people might know it best because Sia sang it.

ABSTRACT:
This song should be squarely in the “unhip” bracket. It’s not quite old enough to be cool in a nostalgic retro way, and not quite new enough to have been in the top 40 in recent memory. Anythin…

Read more

You’re not real

15 January 2008 grant b 0

Dude. What if, like… …like, the WHOLE UNIVERSE was just… …like, made up, maaan? Like it was all VIRTUAL REALITY, man? (asks the latest New […]

Turn the Brain Back On

14 January 2008 grant b 0

ScienceDaily has news from researchers in Los Angeles who found that a single injection with a drug that’s already used to treat rheumatoid arthritis and […]

The Super-Soaker Engine

11 January 2008 grant b 0

Popular Mechanics sheds light on an inventor’s all-new approach to getting power from the sun: The Atlanta-based independent inventor of the Super Soaker squirt gun […]

Supernova Blues

9 January 2008 grant b 0

LiveScience reveals a new risk to our fragile, blue planet from exploding stars. It’s not that they’re likely to blast us all with life-destroying jets […]

Never Sleep Again.

8 January 2008 grant b 0

The Journal of Neuroscience is keeping us up at night with an article called “Systemic and Nasal Delivery of Orexin-A (Hypocretin-1) Reduces the Effects of […]

A Plague of Sea Lice

7 January 2008 grant b 2

Enough of this love for marine arthropods in which we’ve been indulging over recent weeks! New Scientist sets us straight with their revelations over a […]

Killer Bees.

7 January 2008 grant b 0

New Scientist reports on the latest weapon in the war on Colony Collapse Disorder, the syndrome that’s killing off thousands of beehives and potentially threatening […]

Broken wheel of discovery.

5 January 2008 grant b 0

PhysOrg reports on one of 2007’s most dramatic moments of serendipity, when Mars rover Spirit discovered evidence of life by breaking down. As the researchers […]

Bored Aliens.

4 January 2008 grant b 0

New Scientist reports on a problem facing the researchers with the SETI project. It’s not a technological issue, really. Intelligent alien civilizations are probably already […]

Cooking up intelligence.

3 January 2008 grant b 0

Scientific American interviews a primatologist – well, a biological anthropologist named Richard Wrangham – who believes humans evolved big brains because of cooking: Your theory […]

Quiet loudspeakers.

2 January 2008 grant b 0

LiveScience.com is spreading the word on speakers that don’t spread much of anything – except precisely where they’re pointed. Think of them as being like […]

Powered by toxic waste.

1 January 2008 grant b 0

LiveScience.com reports on a new power source from old coal mines – a device that makes electricity from seeping pools of toxic waste: The researchers […]