Science Art: Chain Saw, US 1655856 A, Jan. 10, 1928.

Chain Saw patent illustrationClick to embiggen

A patent for a device putting wood-cutting blades on a chain, so that people can cut down trees – or, in the wake of hurricanes, cut up ones that have fallen down.

Technically, this patent was merely an improvement on existing chainsaws, with better joints between the tooth-carrying links on the chain.

There’s a metaphor there.

The patent also calls it an “endless chain.”

There’s a metaphor there, too.

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Science Art: The Triumph Lathe, from The Watchmaker & Jeweller, Silversmith & Optician, Nov. 1, 1887.

The Triumph Lathe (https://archive.org/details/watchmakerjewe1318871lond)
Click to embiggen

It spins, you know.

This jewelry-making tool was once available from Messrs. H.J. Cooper & Company, on Oxford Street West.

I found it, or at least the magazine in which it appeared, in the Smithsonian archives.

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Science Art: Engine, by ESA

from http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2016/05/Engine
Click to embiggen

The European Space Agency has a way with names. This is in their image library as “Engine.”

The description offers little more detail: The ducted fan engine of the Lilium aircraft.

A Lillium aircraft is one of these, a vehicle that looks like something out of Blade Runner or The Fifth Element. The technology is called Vertical Take-Off and Landing; it’s a VTOL aircraft that claims to be able to act like a taxi between London and Paris in an hour.

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SONG: Frozen Atmospheres

SONG: “Frozen Atmospheres”.

ARTIST: grant.

SOURCE:Record-shattering 2.7-million-year-old ice core reveals start of the ice ages,” Science, 15 Aug 2017, as used in the post “2.7 million-year-old ice shatters records, reveals ancient atmospheres – and ice ages.

ABSTRACT:
I kinda knew I would be writing about this when I read the story. I just had that image of tiny bubbles trapped under compressed ice for an unimaginable span of time – effervescence stopped in its tracks, lightness un…

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Science Art: Sea Lamprey Larvae in Hand 2, by R. McDaniels, Great Lakes Fishery Commission.

R. McDaniels, Great Lakes Fishery Commission, via USGS
Click to embiggen

Fans of Roderick on the Line may recognize these as living metaphors for modern marketing offers. But they’re invading the Great Lakes (literally) where they grow to adulthood and (literally) drain the blood of native fish.

On the other hand (not literally), aww! Cute baby animals!

According to the US Geological Survey, where I found this image, the slower they grow, they more likely these lampreys are to be male. No word on how that’ll help control their population….

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Science Art: Theorica Eclipsis Solaris, by Georg von Peurbach.

from https://archive.org/details/nouiciisadolfsce00sacr

This is a diagram of how a solar eclipse works, or at least how they thought one worked in the 14th century. It might be one of the very first illustrations of its kind. As explained by the book’s description in archive.org:

This book, which contains Sacro Bosco’s influential, 13th-century astronomy tract, along with works by Peurbach and Regiomontanus, is notable for its color illustrations. In particular, this edition, issued by Erhard Ratdolt in 1485, is considered to be the first …

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SONG: Beautiful (Have Another Plum)

23 August 2007 grant b 1

SONG: “Beautiful (Have Another Plum)” [Download] (To download: right-click & “Save As”) ARTIST: grant. SOURCE: “Baboon Birth Control” entry, from “Primates on the Pill”, New […]

Mira, The Tail Star

21 August 2007 grant b 0

We’ve been watching this thing for four centuries, and we only now noticed it had a tail, as Nature reports. A really long tail: Astronomers […]

Ancient germs reborn

10 August 2007 grant b 0

From New Scientist comes a fun story about prehistoric bacteria being brought back to life by meddling scientists: Kay Bidle of Rutgers University in New […]

I Want My UFO

9 August 2007 grant b 0

Moller International, a company that’s been trying to market flying cars for a long while now, has finally made its breakthrough, reports LiveScience: [I]t looks […]

Science Tattoos

8 August 2007 grant b 0

Some researchers wear their subjects of study underneath their sleeves. I quite like the octopus….