Science Art: Hypocaustum excavated behind the old city of Rottenburg am Neckar , by Eduard von Kallee.

Roman central heatingClick to embiggen

An ancient Roman central heating system – hot water would be flooded through the basement, and the floors would warm up. “Hypocaust” was the name of the system. This particular one, painted in 1884, was built in the city of Rottenburg am Neckar, which the Romans called Sumelocenna when they lived there. The city might have gotten its “rotten” name because of an earlier version of the word “rotten,” which also meant “ruined” – the Germans built their city over the ruins of th…

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Science Art: Four views of the Alvan Clark & Sons workshop..., from Scientific American, Sep. 24, 1887

Here, an astronomical family is building a 36-inch refractor telescope known as the Great Lick Refractor in the 1880s. It’s named for James Lick, an eccentric entrepreneur who financed the observatory. Please, don’t lick the telescope.

The lenses were fabricated in France, then shipped to Boston where Alvan Clark and his sons ground and polished the glass, built the telescope to house the lenses, then set them in place in a new observatory in Harvard College. They had to wait to put the fini…

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Science Art: Progne purpurea. Purple martin, by Howard Jones, 1886

from https://digital.cincinnatilibrary.org/digital/collection/p16998coll59/id/91/rec/3Click to embiggen

A bird in its home (grown on a vine, fashioned by humans).

Cute little guy, too.

I found this on the Scientific Illustration tumblr, which got it from the Cincinnati Public Library’s copy of Illustrations of the nests and eggs of birds of Ohio.

Apparently, the book started as a kind of by-subscription service, like a bird-watching newsletter, but then was bound together and published as a guide.

Seems like something people still do today, I suppose. Only more …

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Science Art: Korowaar, page 488 of The Cruise of The Marchesa, 1889.

a Papuan ancestor-statue

This image is from the British Library archive, a book called The Cruise of the Marchesa … With maps and … woodcuts drawn by J. Keulemans, C. Whymper and others. by Francis H. H. Guillemard, a medical doctor who decided to explore New Guinea (and the Malay Archipelago) rather than settling down in Kent to practice medicine. Then, Cyprus. Then, Morocco. Then, Cambridge, where he became geographical editor of the Cambridge University Press.

The book says this about the korowaar:

On…

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SONG: My Batteries

SONG: “My Batteries”.

ARTIST: grant.

SOURCE: Jacob Margolis’ Twitter feed, 13 Feb 2019, 3:30 AM “The last message they received…,” as used in the post “A Moment of Silence for Opportunity.”

ABSTRACT: This song was kind of a no-brainer. (I couldn’t afford more, the weekend I’ve had – sick day, plumbing emergency, surprise bulldozers removing part of my back yard….) I mean, it’s not literally a moment of silence. It is using a technique I used more than a decade ago to put a six-word…

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Science Art: Ossicula Organi Auditus Diversorium Animalium (Aural-Organ Bones of Diverse Animals), by Athanasius Kircher

from Musurgia Universalis: http://special.lib.gla.ac.uk/exhibns/month/nov2002.html

A close-up of the tiny ear-bones of a few kinds of animals, including human beings.

This is a detail of a page from Musurgia Universalis, which was the book of the month at the Glasgow University Library Special Collections Department for November 2002. A few centuries earlier, in 1650, it was a groundbreaking work by the Jesuit polymath, Father Athanasius Kircher.

He liked music, and was very, very curious about how listening happened.

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East/West Brain Differences.

6 March 2008 grant b 0

M.I.T. researchers, cited in the Boston Globe, have used brain scanners and simple tasks to map out neurological differences between Westerners and East Asians: In […]

Stoned Moses.

5 March 2008 grant b 0

Ha’aretz reports on a rather unusual theory coming out of Hebrew University – that Moses was tripping his way down Mt. Sinai: “And all the […]

From Weight Into Light.

3 March 2008 grant b 0

PhysOrg brightens our day with a fun new invention that’s actually rather old-fashioned. It’s a gravity-powered lamp. The LED lamp, named Gravia, is an acrylic […]

Chimps are Wired for Words.

29 February 2008 grant b 0

ScienceDaily reports on new findings from the Yerkes National Primate Research Center, who say that chimpanzee brains are really close to human brains as far […]

Red Spot Mystery

25 February 2008 grant b 0

Discovery assures us that space contines to be utterly inexplicable – at least as far as that famous, bizarre, permanent hurricane on the King of […]

SONG: Flip the Switch.

23 February 2008 grant b 0

SONG: “Flip the Switch” [Download] (To download: right-click & “Save As”) ARTIST: grant. SOURCE: “Deep brain stimulation may help Alzheimer patient’s memories”, Telegraph.co.uk, 31 January […]

Cloned Booger.

22 February 2008 grant b 0

BBC News reports on a new breakthrough from South Korea. A biotech firm named RNL Bio is cloning a pit bull named Booger: RNL Bio […]

A Flying Telescope!

21 February 2008 grant b 0

How I resisted calling this “Eye in the Sky” I don’t know. But yeah, Universe Today is all excited about SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared […]

Making Oil Out of Thin Air.

20 February 2008 grant b 2

That’s what they’re doing at Los Alamos National Laboratory, according to the New York Times. Zap CO2 and H2O from the atmosphere with electricity and […]

Star Wars Practice Run?

19 February 2008 grant b 0

So, Wired’s Danger Room has an interesting take on the Pentagon’s response to that crashing spy satellite we mentioned here not too long ago. See, […]