Science Art: Storage and Launching of A.4. Rocket Projectile, 1940s.

from https://www.nationalmuseum.af.mil/Upcoming/Photos/igphoto/2000453637/Click to embiggen

This is how Allied intelligence pictured German V2 rockets being used during World War II. A decade and a half later, this was how we put things (and, eventually, people) into space.

Image from the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force.

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Science Art: A Magnetic Wormhole by J. Prat-Camps, C. Navau & A. Sanchez, 2015.

from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:A_Magnetic_Wormhole_Fig._1_-_J._Prat-Camps,_C._Navau_%26_A._Sanchez_-_Scientific_Reports_5,_Art._no._12488_(2015).jpgClick to embiggen

From the Wikimedia Commons description:

(a) The field of a magnetic source (right) is appearing as an isolated magnetic monopole when passing through the magnetostatic wormhole; the whole spherical device is magnetically undetectable. (b) The wormhole is composed of (from left to right) an outer spherical ferromagnetic metasurface, a spherical superconducting layer, and an inner spirally wound ferromagnetic sheet.

In other words, this is a diagram of how these scien…

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Science Art: Atom Nucleon

by Shymaahemdan, Wikimedia Commons

“Atom” used to be the indivisible unit of matter, the thing smaller than which it was impossible to go. Now we know there are things inside atoms – neutrons, protons, electrons – and things that those things are made of. A nucleon (which is the stuff a nucleus is made of – protons and neutrons) is made of quarks – up and down quarks, specifically.

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SONG: Quantum Biology

SONG: “Quantum Biology”.

ARTIST: grant.

SOURCE: Scientific, Vol. 27, Dec. 2018, “’Schrödinger’s Bacterium’ Could Be a Quantum Biology Milestone”, as used in the post Weird life force: Quantum-entangled bacteria.

ABSTRACT:
“No one has ever witnessed a star, a planet or a cat in superposition or a state of quantum entanglement.” That’s what the SciAm article said. Quantum stuff is supposed to happen way, way, way beyond that, at a level that’s smaller than molecules, smaller than atoms…

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Science Art: Zanclus cornatus and Acanthurus nigra, by Josef Maria Eder and Eduard Valenta.

from https://publicdomainreview.org/collections/early-experiments-with-x-rays-1896/ Click to embiggen
Two fish from one of the first collections of X-ray photographs, published in Versuche über Photographie mittelst der Röntgen’schen Strahlen, 1896.

From the “Early Experiments with X-Rays” article at Public Domain Review. The collection also has cameos, newborn animals and young girls’ hands and feet.

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Science Art: Cymatics, by Nigel Stanford

I’m not really that much of an electronica fan – at least not danceable electronic music – but this video is kind of awesome.

I mean, it’s awesome even though I know a Tesla coil doesn’t really sound like that (it’s a lot gnarlier, but you can still play it like an instrument).

All the experiments are real, Stanford describes them all here (and lets on that the video was filmed before the music was written – they figured out which sounds made the best visuals with each experiment, an…

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Science Art: Albinus & Wandelaar

16 September 2007 grant b 0

Tabulae sceleti et musculorum corporis humani by anatomist Bernard Albinus and illustrator Jan Wandelaar, 1747. Apparently, the rhino’s name was Clara, and she was quite […]

Dying breeds.

14 September 2007 grant b 0

We’re in the middle of massive extinction event, warns SciDevNet – not of species, but of breeds. As in livestock. And that can be bigger […]

Xenomorphs on the reef.

13 September 2007 grant b 0

Oh, man. Nature gives us another reason to be terrified of moray eels. They’re just like the alien that stalked Sigourney Weaver: Like the fearsome […]

The Hygiene Hypothesis

10 September 2007 grant b 0

We’re too clean, reports Science Daily. We need to get dirty to stay healthy: Families with three or more children – a more common family […]

There’s a hole…

7 September 2007 grant b 1

By now, you’ve probably heard about the gaping hole in the middle of everything, as covered by Scientific American (from Reuters): The team at the […]

Ice-9 saves lives!

6 September 2007 grant b 0

Or, well, something like Ice-9. At least, so says New Scientist: Layers of ice of few nanometres thick can remain frozen at human body temperature […]

No more batteries.

5 September 2007 grant b 0

Check out what Scientific American has to say about these gizmos called “ultracapacitors” that could soon fuel cars without gasoline… and without chemical batteries: Ultracapacitors […]

Stowaway Genes

1 September 2007 grant b 0

Science Daily reports on some very strange behavior found in bacterial DNA – one parasite’s entire genome is replicated by the host’s body. And, the […]