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Articles tagged with: acoustics

Written By: grant on July 7, 2014 No Comment

Wall Street Journal has an interesting piece on how old smart phones are being used to listen for disrupted sleep patterns, illegal loggers, gunshots, breeding cicadas and a host of other sounds:

App makers have long focused on detecting speech and music, but some upstarts are turning to a wider variety of sound-detection tasks. […]

Written By: grant on January 3, 2014 No Comment

The Telegraph marvels at physicists learning how to levitate and move solid objects using sound waves:

They then levitate match heads, drops of water, screws and nuts.

The researchers at the University of Tokyo say they hope to refine the technique so it can be used to manipulate delicate electronic components when assembling hardware.

The Japanese video […]

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Written By: grant on June 11, 2013 No Comment

Science Daily sticks it to the people with an innate ear for what’s a C and what isn’t. Apparently, “perfect pitch” can be fooled:

Absolute pitch has been “idealized in popular culture as a rare and desirable musical endowment, partly because several well-known composers, such as Mozart, Beethoven, Chopin and Handel, have been assumed […]

Written By: grant on March 18, 2013 No Comment

Wired reveals the weird ways nanotechnologists are making sound behave like light… this time, by creating a Star Trek weapon in the lab:

Because laser is an acronym for “light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation,” these new contraptions – which exploit particles of sound called phonons – should properly be called phasers. Such […]

Written By: grant on November 21, 2012 No Comment

Nature explores the strange mathematics of yuck – the neurological reason why we find dissonant music hard to listen to:

Consonant chords are, roughly speaking, made up of notes that ‘sound good’ together, like middle C and the G above it (an interval called a fifth). Dissonant chords are combinations that sound jarring, like […]

Written By: grant on November 20, 2012 No Comment

I’m not sure when this happened, but NOAA thinks they’ve finally identified the mysterious underwater sound known as ‘The Bloop’:

The broad spectrum sounds recorded in the summer of 1997 are consistent with icequakes generated by large icebergs as they crack and fracture. NOAA hydrophones deployed in the Scotia Sea detected numerous icequakes with […]

Written By: grant on July 17, 2012 No Comment

Fun to read Sound on Sound’s behind-the-mixing-board analysis of what made “Somebody That I Used To Know” so darn catchy – even though it breaks some Top-40 rules:

The song’s mixer, François Tétaz, had a vision for it from the beginning. He also thought long and hard about aspects of the mix that are likely […]

Written By: grant on March 7, 2012 No Comment

BBC reveals a Japanese project that combines biology, engineering and beauty – spinning violin strings out of spider silk:

Shigeyoshi Osaki of Japan’s Nara Medical University has been interested in the mechanical properties of spider silk for a number of years.

In particular, he has studied the “dragline” silk that spiders dangle from, quantifying its […]

Written By: grant on March 2, 2012 No Comment

Technology Review cuts out all the chatter with their lowdown on an honest-to-God silence ray:

Today, Kazutaka Kurihara at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology in Tskuba and Koji Tsukada at Ochanomizu University, both in Japan, present a radical solution: a speech-jamming device that forces recalcitrant speakers into submission.

The idea is […]

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