archaeology

Science Art: Lecture 2, Figure 5, from Lectures on Ventilation,

LOV-Lecture2-Fig5
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from Lectures on Ventilation (1869) by Lewis W. Leeds, via Public Domain Review.

The invisible made visible.

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Science Art: The Golden Horns of Gallehus.

goldenhornsgalleus

These are two ancient horns, made of gold and engraved (or embossed) with runes and pictures that seem to tell a story. Or maybe just look cool.

Also, they are horns that it seems like no one ever blew (one translation of one inscription is about drinking), and they are horns that are not there:

The original horns were stolen and melted down in 1802. Casts made of the horns in the late 18th century were also lost. Replicas of the horns must thus rely on 17th and 18th-century drawings…

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SONG: "How the Moon Began"

SONG: “How the Moon Began.”

ARTIST: grant.

SOURCE:Based on “Puzzle of Moon’s origin resolved”, Nature, 8 April 2015, as used in the post “Scientists: The moon was formed when Earth smacked her twin sister.

ABSTRACT: Once again, Allison said this was the story that needed a song, and she was right. At around the same time, I was listening to “Cruel Sister” and thinking about murder ballads, but somehow, this didn’t come out folksy at all. I mean, except that it’s about ancient sisters…

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Science Art: Las Cascadas Slide (Section 6) from AB Nichols Notebook Vol. 38, 1910

lasCascadasSlide_ABNicholsNotebookVol38
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This is a handmade map from the construction of the Panama Canal, one of history’s greatest feats of engineering. Culebra Cut is where the project experienced massive landslides (is it fair to say some of them are still going on today? I think it isit is).

So the folks in charge of the dig, the Isthmian Canal Commission, got geologists down there to study how to move all that dirt out of the way without burying any workers and steam shovels and train cars.

This is…

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Science Art: Firing in the Fog, 1995

FiringInTheFog_GPN-2000-000550
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In which NASA tests a Space Shuttle engine in Mississippi, on a cool and humid day.

Found on GRIN.

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Science Art: Detail from Plate LXVIII from British oology, c. 1835

BritishOologyAnthusAquaticusAnthusPratensis

That’s Anthus aquaticus and Anthus pratensis… the rock lark up top, and the tit lark at the bottom. Stop laughing, you in the back.

There are more lark eggs where these came from.

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Our cannibal roots.

17 April 2015 // 0 Comments

Science Daily digs into new evidence that early humans enjoyed an occasional bite of early human: Gough’s Cave in Somerset was thought to have given [...]

Drones for archaeology

6 April 2015 // 0 Comments

PhysOrg has more on using drones… not just to find priceless historical sites, but to protect them from looters: With aerial photographs taken by a [...]

A new dawn of humankind

19 March 2015 // 0 Comments

A bit of a jawbone (and a bit of computer modeling) has given us a long-awaited glimpse of our new oldest ancestor: On 29 January 2013, scientists combing [...]
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