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Articles tagged with: astronomy

Written By: grant on July 4, 2014 No Comment

Science Daily has us imagining that message being broadcast to an an interstellar ship full of would-be colonists, thanks to new research that’s found some so-called “Goldilocks planets” are actually star-belches:

“This result is exciting because it explains, for the first time, all the previous and somewhat conflicting observations of the intriguing dwarf star Gliese [...]

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Written By: grant on June 11, 2014 No Comment

Nature writes so calmly about shockwaves of such epic proportions:

Four massive clusters of galaxies are plowing into one another at a crash site about five billion light-years from Earth. The conglomeration is creating one giant concentration of thousands of galaxies. “This is really one of the most massive clusters we know of and [...]

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Written By: grant on June 3, 2014 No Comment

Harvard researchers have found a whole new kind of planet. It’s just like ours, only way bigger:

Astronomers announced today that they have discovered a new type of planet – a rocky world weighing 17 times as much as Earth. Theorists believed such a world couldn’t form because anything so hefty would grab hydrogen [...]

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Written By: grant on May 30, 2014 No Comment

Nature covers the hard decisions that NASA faces in its latest budget… which may include shutting down a great space telescope (and an asteroid watchdog) to keep some other great telescopes running:

he infrared Spitzer Space Telescope, however, may be deactivated due to lack of funding. And a bid to convert data collected by the [...]

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Written By: grant on April 18, 2014 No Comment

Universe Today celebrates a Goldilocks discovery. The Kepler mission has found a planet just the right size and in just the right place to have life on it:

The newly-confirmed extrasolar planet has been dubbed Kepler-186f. It is the fifth and outermost planet discovered orbiting the red dwarf star Kepler-186, located 490 light-years away. [...]

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Written By: grant on April 6, 2014 No Comment
Science Art: <i>Hubble Views Stellar Genesis in the Southern Pinwheel</i>


Click to embiggen

This is a galaxy named M83, which is usually a faint smudge in the constellation Hydra. Up close, however, Hubble Space Telescope was able to see that it’s “ablaze with star formation.”

The image is also cool for another reason:

This image is being used to support a citizen science [...]

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Written By: grant on March 30, 2014 No Comment
Science Art: <i>Portrait of John Kepler</i>, 1854

This is the face of the man who was ROBBED by the third episode of Cosmos. Planetary motion? Elliptical orbits? Not Newton’s ideas – this guy’s.

And the story of how he figured them out is pretty darn interesting. See, Kepler was a divinity student with a really fascinating theology….

This image comes from [...]

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Written By: grant on March 26, 2014 No Comment

If you never thought cosmic loneliness was a computing problem, think again. In Popular Mechanics, SETI leader Seth Shostak says Moore’s Law means we’ll find aliens in the next 20 years:

If you’re trying to determine when we’re going to succeed with SETI, that really depends on only two questions. First, how many societies [...]

Written By: grant on March 23, 2014 No Comment
Science Art: <i>Nebulae in the Pleiades</i>, by the Yerkes Observatory

Click to embiggen

This is an old photograph taken through the largest refracting telescope (no mirrors, just a really big lens) in the world, the Yerkes Observatory in Wisconsin.

Edwin Hubble, Albert Einstein and Carl Sagan all looked at the sky through the observatory’s huge lenses. This image was taken sometime before 1919, when [...]

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