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Articles tagged with: marine biology

Written By: grant on December 27, 2014 No Comment

SONG: “Not Even Dancing Works.” [Download]

ARTIST: grant.

SOURCE: Based on “Zoologger: Dancing in time makes crabs sexual failures“, New Scientist, 4 December 2014, as used in the post “Dancing to the beat makes fiddler crab sexual… failures.”

ABSTRACT: Are songs about dancing dumb? I dunno. Hard to […]

Written By: grant on December 11, 2014 No Comment

New Scientist pulls back the curtain on how electric eels “remote control” their prey, freezing them right next to their hungry mouths:

The experiments that untangled these mechanisms were devised and run by Kenneth Catania at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. In a natural environment, Catania watched an eel hunting and measured its electric discharges. […]

Written By: grant on October 10, 2014 No Comment

Nature breaks the news to behaviorists – and this is more important than it might seem – that fish don’t really think mirrors are uninvited strangers:

“There’s been a very long history of using a mirror as it’s just so handy,” says Robert Elwood, an animal-behaviour researcher at Queen’s University in Belfast, UK. Using […]

Written By: grant on September 9, 2014 No Comment

It’s taken quite a while, but AP can finally report that blue whales off the coast of California have finally reached pre-whaling-industry levels:

Researchers previously assumed that the pre-whaling population was higher than that. However, the study using historical data to estimate the number of whales caught between 1905 and 1971 — when whaling […]

Written By: grant on September 7, 2014 No Comment
Science Art: <i>Echinodermata, Plate V</i> detail, by James A. Grieg, 1921

This is the heart (and brain and pretty much anything that’s not an arm) of a brittle star, as sketched for Echinodermata, a study of the sea urchins, sand dollars, sea stars and close relatives collected by the Michael Sars Deep Sea Expedition in the North Atlantic in 1910. It was published by […]

Written By: grant on August 10, 2014 No Comment
Science Art: <i>The Common Angler (</i>Lophius piscatorus<i>) (After W. Von Wright in Smitt)</i>, 1905.

Click to embiggen

This is from the Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections in the Biodiversity Library.

I bet there’s all *kinds* of things in the Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections. Doesn’t that mean, like, their junk drawer?

Can you even imagine? Full of anglerfish… and stranger things.

Written By: grant on July 31, 2014 No Comment

Science Daily reveals the record-breaking brooding period of the deep-sea octopus:

In May 2007, during one of these surveys, the researchers discovered a female octopus clinging to a rocky ledge just above the floor of the canyon, about 4,600 feet below the ocean surface. The octopus, a species known as Graneledone boreopacifica, had not been […]

Written By: grant on October 13, 2013 No Comment
Science Art: <i>Holocentre à grosses épines</i>, from <i>Histoire Naturelle des Poissons</i>, Volume 3, 1828

A Holocentrus hastatum, or Sargocentron hastatus, or red soldier fish. They have big spines, you see.

This one comes from A Natural History of Fish, by Georges Cuvier and M. Valenciennes, which I found on wapiti8’s Flickr account.

Written By: grant on September 17, 2013 No Comment

You want to learn about the hidden history of the ocean? Look within, Nature says… within the earwax of a mighty blue whale:

The team, led by Sascha Usenko, a environmental scientist at Baylor University in Waco, Texas, extracted an earplug from a blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) killed in a collision with a ship […]

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