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Articles tagged with: zoology

Written By: grant on September 27, 2014 No Comment

National Geographic reveals the newest Panamanian sensation to enter the world of science:

A new species of poison dart frog so teeny it can fit on a fingernail has been discovered in a rain forest in Panama, a new study says.

Scientists found the toxic, electric-orange amphibian in a single hilly area near the Caribbean […]

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Written By: grant on July 6, 2014 No Comment
Science Art: Tadarida teniotis Rafinesque.

This is a bat from Tajikstan. According to the 2002 State of the Environment Report, it’s a rare bat. The European free-tailed bat.

No, he doesn’t look very free in that image. Looks a little oppressed, to tell the truth.

Follow your tail, rare, worried bat.

Be free.

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Written By: grant on June 29, 2014 No Comment

As the U.S. Geological Survey puts it:

This video was edited and compiled from raw footage recorded by a camera equipped radio collar that was put on a female polar bear in the Beaufort Sea during April 2014 by the US Geological Survey. The video, which is the first ever from a free-ranging polar […]

Written By: grant on June 20, 2014 No Comment

Or so says National Geographic-profiled biopsychologist Lori Marino, an expert in the brains of “lesser” animals:

Formerly a full-fledged research scientist who found measuring the braincases of dolphin skulls utterly absorbing, Marino has become a self-described “scientist-advocate” for all animals, large and small.

While she’s continuing to do research (for instance, she’s doing a comparative study […]

Written By: grant on March 20, 2014 No Comment

Nature reveals proof that elephants recognize individual humans – including the languages used who did them wrong:

Biologists Karen McComb and Graeme Shannon at the University of Sussex in Brighton, UK, guessed that African elephants (Loxodonta africana) might be able to listen to human speech and make use of what they heard. To tease […]

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Written By: grant on February 21, 2014 No Comment

Michael Hearst! Composer! Writer! Player of atypical instruments! Science fan!

You are compiling instrumentals based on wonderful animals, like the glass frog, the magnapinna squid, and, as performed below by The Kronos Quartet, the aye-aye:

You are a man of science, wonder and music.

The Guild salutes you!

Here’s more about him in his […]

Written By: grant on February 19, 2014 No Comment

Science magazine reaches out with new research showing that elephants don’t just mourn their dead, but also try to comfort those in anguish:

The study “is the first to investigate responses to distress by Asian elephants,” which “is inherently difficult to assess because one has to wait for opportunities to arise spontaneously,” says Shermin […]

Written By: grant on February 10, 2014 No Comment

OK, that’s a little hyperbolic, but only a little. The Guardian has more on the last chimp “mega-culture” just found in the central African jungle:

Harboured by the remote and pristine forests in the north of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and on the border of the Central African Republic, the chimps were completely […]

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Written By: grant on January 2, 2014 No Comment

I can’t even begin with this one. But yes, researchers at the Czech University of Agriculture have determined that dogs orient themselves to magnetic north when excreting:

We measured the direction of the body axis in 70 dogs of 37 breeds during defecation (1,893 observations) and urination (5,582 observations) over a two-year period. After […]

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