Science Art: Plate VI from Here, a number of broken gifts for the carpenters and lovers…., by Lorenz Stöer, 1567.

Scientific illustration of three-dimentsional solids, illustrating geometric ideas in an Early Modern woodcut.
Scientific illustration of three-dimentsional solids, illustrating geometric ideas in an Early Modern woodcut.

I’ve posted illustrations from this remarkable book of geometric studies before. This one looks, to this old gamer’s eyes, like 1D4+1D20+1. (For non-gamers: It’s the shape of the dice… though there is no spherical die, really, so the round one could only roll a 1.)

I love the place-ness of these Geometria et Perspectiva engravings, the sense of half-remembered locations like something one might recall from a dream. And the fact that the only words in the book are the long title* and the motto: “Who would do right by everyone? No one would even try.”

It was meant to provide examples for inlay-carpenters, the people who made marquetry.

*Geometria et Perspectiva, containing various ruined buildings, useful to intarsia workers, as well as for the special pleasure of many other amateurs; ordered and arranged by Lorenz Stoer, painter and citizen of Augsburg, or HierInn Etliche Zerbrochne Gebew den Schreiner In eingelegter Arbait dienstlich auch vil andern Liebhabern Zu sonder gefallen geordnet unnd gestelt Durch Lorenz Stör Maller Bürger Inn Augspurg LS Mit Rö Kay May aller genedigiste
privilegio nit nachzedruckhen.